B-ENT
Case Report

Oculomotor Abnormalities in Large Cerebellopontine Angle Tumors: A Case Series of Bruns’ Nystagmus

1.

Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium

2.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands

3.

Department of Neurosurgery, Antwerp University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium

4.

Department of Translational Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium

5.

Department of Neurosurgery, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands

6.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, Antwerp University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium

7.

Faculty of Physics, Tomsk State Research University, Tomsk, Russia

8.

Deparment of Translational Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Belgium

9.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery, Antwerp University Hospital, Belgium

B-ENT 2022; 18: 204-207
DOI: 10.5152/B-ENT.2022.21793
Read: 224 Downloads: 104 Published: 01 July 2022

Patients with large or giant large cerebellopontine angle lesions can present with a wide range of audiovestibular symptoms, including Bruns’ nystagmus. This is a rare variant of bidirectional nystagmus, characterized by a combination of slow, large-amplitude nystagmus when looking to the side of the lesion and rapid small-amplitude nystagmus when looking to the contralateral side. This phenomenon arises due to a unique situation in which 2 different neural circuits, specifically the floccular pathways and peripheral vestibular pathways, are simultaneously involved. The presence of Bruns’ nystagmus is a good indicator for large CPA lesions of at least 3 cm in diameter with compression and displacement of the cerebellum, comprising the flocculus, and/or the brainstem. A case series of 4 different cases illustrates that investigating the presence of such nystagmus could be incorporated into the common diagnostic work-up of CPA lesions, since it is of particular interest in localizing large CPA tumors requiring urgent imaging

Cite this article as: Bilotta G, Stultiens J, Menovsky T, et al. Oculomotor abnormalities in large cerebellopontine angle tumors: A case series of bruns’ nystagmus. B-ENT 2022;18(3):204-207.

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